candids by Jo » a lifestyle blog that centers on food, travel and leading a creative life.

Travel photography with Sony Nex 5n

Rather than lug my heavy Canon dSLR with me to Cambodia I opted to rely on my 2 year old Sony Nex 5n for travel photos. Call me crazy but this was a hard decision to make. If not for the relatively recent incidences of tourists in Phnom Penh getting robbed at gun point – in broad daylight – I would have happily added an extra 7lbs of Canon & lens to my load. Instead, the unobtrusive micro four thirds camera and two prime lenses came along for the adventure.

The Sony Nex 5n was a great for staying under the radar, making it ideal for travel and street photography.  It was also my preferable companion when I was drenched in sweat in 90 degree weather and climbed stairs upon stairs in the temples around Angkor.  Even the Brit breathlessly asked me during one of our climbs, “Aren’t you glad you don’t have to carry that clunky camera around?”

The only con to my four thirds camera is the lack of a viewfinder.  I’m convinced I compose better with a viewfinder rather than rely on the LCD screen, which is the only option with the Nex 5n.  While I can purchase a viewfinder attachment I cannot justify the price ($240 or £232) versus the amount of use… yet.  Instead I forked over cash for two prime lenses, the 16mm and 50mm, both of which I used in Cambodia.

In a previous post I had mentioned how well the Sony Nex 5n does under low lighting conditions which I think might be one of its best attributes.  All in all with the proper lens (read: prime lens) this little camera packs a lot of punch for travel or street photographers who want to be inconspicuous.  Here are a few photos taken from trips to the markets.  You can find other pictures from my trip to Cambodia here and here – some of which might be portfolio material!

Cambodia_lunchtimepintopinterest

Cambodia_chive_cakespintopinterest

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